Modern Foreign Languages

Intent

Trawden Forest Primary school intends to offer a French curriculum that will inspire and excite our pupils using a wide variety of topics. French has been selected as our modern foreign language because it is the chosen language for our feeder high schools and it is the language we feel most confident in teaching. We want to develop the confidence and competence of each child in French, starting with our youngest children in Early Years, and for them to be passionate, curious and confident about their own learning abilities when they finish the primary school phase of their education.

 

We will help them develop and demonstrate progress in the 5 key language skills necessary for learning French: Speaking -  Listening -  Reading -  Writing -  Grammar. These skills will develop children’s ability to understand what they hear and read and enable them to express themselves in speech and writing. We will extend their knowledge of how language works and explore the similarities and differences between French and English. We will also encourage them to learn about cultures in other countries and compare it with their own. This will ensure that the French knowledge of our pupils progresses within each academic year and the standards and attainment will improve year upon year resulting in a higher percentage of pupils meeting or exceeding national DfE requirements.

Research Link

The teaching of a foreign language was introduced into the National Curriculum in primary schools, mainly because of the belief that young children learn languages faster. Research has shown that children of a younger age, are more enthusiastic about learning a new language and therefore, there is a strong case for an early start (as young as Early Years and KS1) in order to capitalise on this enthusiasm as well as providing daily opportunities for children to be exposed to the language. Their acquisition of a new language is most effective when taught through short, regular sessions. Myles, F (2017) Learning foreign languages in primary schools: is younger better?

 

MFL in Action